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Wednesday, November 30, 2011

CAPTURED-MURDER: Kenneth Ray McFadden

WANTED: Mr. McFadden is the suspect in the Homicide that occurred at 9200 Tedburn Circle, Little Rock, AR, 72209 on 11/30/2011. He currently has one (1) active warrant out of this department for Murder in the First Degree. He may be armed and dangerous. Anyone with info should contact LRPD Homicide Detectives at 371-4626.

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

NIA Agriculture Update


On October 30th, 2009, NIA released an article 'U.S. Inflation to Appear Next in Food and Agriculture' in which we said, "A massive rise in agriculture prices is just around the corner."
Since then, as a result of the Federal Reserve's money printing, agricultural commodities made their largest ever short-term gain. After dipping from their 2011 highs, we believe agricultural commodities are likely to soon resume their rally as the Fed prepares QE3. From their lows in 2010, we look for agricultural commodities to make the same percentage gains seen from their lows to highs in the 1970s by the year 2015, at the latest. We look for agricultural commodities to reach their 1970s highs adjusted for the real rate of price inflation by year 2020.
Here are the percentage gains that agricultural commodities made from their lows in 2010 to their highs in 2011:
Cotton +241%, Sugar +164%, Corn +146%, Coffee +142%, Wheat +110%, Orange Juice +63%, Soybeans +57%, Cocoa +49%. Average: +121.5%
After reaching their highs earlier this year, here are the percentages that each agricultural commodity has dipped based on their current prices:
Cotton -60%, Cocoa -37%, Sugar -35%, Wheat -33%, Corn -25%, Coffee -23% Soybeans -21%, Orange Juice -13%. Average: -31%
After dipping, here are their current gains from their lows in 2010 to their current prices:
Coffee +86%, Corn +84%, Sugar +71%, Orange Juice +43%, Wheat +40%, Cotton +37%, Soybeans +24%, Cocoa -6%. Average +47%
Here are the gains these agricultural commodities made from their lows to their highs during the 1970s inflation crisis:
Sugar +2,480%, Cocoa +1,095%, Orange Juice +588%, Coffee +525%, Soybeans +435%, Wheat +404%, Cotton +311%, Corn +265%. Average +763%
Gains these agricultural commodities need to make from current prices to reach the same percentage gains from the 1970s, beginning from their lows in 2010:
Sugar +1,412%, Cocoa +1,169%, Orange Juice +384%, Soybeans +330%, Wheat +260%, Coffee +236%, Cotton +200%, Corn +98%. Average +511%
Gains agricultural commodities need to make from current prices to reach their 1970s highs adjusted for inflation based on the CPI:
Sugar +1,126%, Cocoa +728%, Soybeans +473%, Cotton +443%, Coffee +441%, Wheat +420%, Orange Juice +348%, Corn +200%. Average +522%
Gains agricultural commodities need to make from current prices to reach their 1970s highs adjusted for inflation based on the real rate of price inflation:
Sugar +4,203%, Cocoa +2,810%, Soybeans +1,914%, Cotton +1,809%, Coffee +1,800%, Wheat +1,726%, Orange Juice +1,473%, Corn +954%. Average +2,086%

NIA will be releasing many additional extremely important agriculture updates in the weeks and months ahead.
National Inflation Association | 96 Linwood Plaza #172 | Fort Lee, NJ 07024

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THE INFORMATION PROVIDED ON THIS SITE IS PROVIDED AS A PUBLIC SERVICE ONLY AND SHOULD NOT BE USED TO THREATEN, INTIMIDATE, OR HARASS. MISUSE OF THIS INFORMATION MAY RESULT IN CRIMINAL PROSECUTION.
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Read more: http://www.city-data.com/so/Arkansas.html#ixzz1f6W4NSdC

Monday, November 28, 2011

AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION STATEMENT ON "RACE" (May 17, 1998)

AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION STATEMENT ON "RACE" (May 17, 1998)
The following statement was adopted by the Executive Board of the American Anthropological Association, acting on a draft prepared by a committee of representative American anthropologists. It does not reflect a consensus of all members of the AAA, as individuals vary in their approaches to the study of "race." We believe that it represents generally the contemporary thinking and scholarly positions of a majority of anthropologists.

In the United States both scholars and the general public have been conditioned to viewing human races as natural and separate divisions within the human species based on visible physical differences. With the vast expansion of scientific knowledge in this century, however, it has become clear that human populations are not unambiguous, clearly demarcated, biologically distinct groups. Evidence from the analysis of genetics (e.g., DNA) indicates that most physical variation, about 94%, lies within so-called racial groups. Conventional geographic "racial" groupings differ from one another only in about 6% of their genes. This means that there is greater variation within "racial" groups than between them. In neighboring populations there is much overlapping of genes and their phenotypic (physical) expressions. Throughout history whenever different groups have come into contact, they have interbred. The continued sharing of genetic materials has maintained all of humankind as a single species.


Physical variations in any given trait tend to occur gradually rather than abruptly over geographic areas. And because physical traits are inherited independently of one another, knowing the range of one trait does not predict the presence of others. For example, skin color varies largely from light in the temperate areas in the north to dark in the tropical areas in the south; its intensity is not related to nose shape or hair texture. Dark skin may be associated with frizzy or kinky hair or curly or wavy or straight hair, all of which are found among different indigenous peoples in tropical regions. These facts render any attempt to establish lines of division among biological populations both arbitrary and subjective.

Historical research has shown that the idea of "race" has always carried more meanings than mere physical differences; indeed, physical variations in the human species have no meaning except the social ones that humans put on them. Today scholars in many fields argue that "race" as it is understood in the United States of America was a social mechanism invented during the 18th century to refer to those populations brought together in colonial America: the English and other European settlers, the conquered Indian peoples, and those peoples of Africa brought in to provide slave labor.

From its inception, this modern concept of "race" was modeled after an ancient theorem of the Great Chain of Being, which posited natural categories on a hierarchy established by God or nature. Thus "race" was a mode of classification linked specifically to peoples in the colonial situation. It subsumed a growing ideology of inequality devised to rationalize European attitudes and treatment of the conquered and enslaved peoples. Proponents of slavery in particular during the 19th century used "race" to justify the retention of slavery. The ideology magnified the differences among Europeans, Africans, and Indians, established a rigid hierarchy of socially exclusive categories underscored and bolstered unequal rank and status differences, and provided the rationalization that the inequality was natural or God-given. The different physical traits of African-Americans and Indians became markers or symbols of their status differences.

As they were constructing US society, leaders among European-Americans fabricated the cultural/behavioral characteristics associated with each "race," linking superior traits with Europeans and negative and inferior ones to blacks and Indians. Numerous arbitrary and fictitious beliefs about the different peoples were institutionalized and deeply embedded in American thought.

Early in the 19th century the growing fields of science began to reflect the public consciousness about human differences. Differences among the "racial" categories were projected to their greatest extreme when the argument was posed that Africans, Indians, and Europeans were separate species, with Africans the least human and closer taxonomically to apes.

Ultimately "race" as an ideology about human differences was subsequently spread to other areas of the world. It became a strategy for dividing, ranking, and controlling colonized people used by colonial powers everywhere. But it was not limited to the colonial situation. In the latter part of the 19th century it was employed by Europeans to rank one another and to justify social, economic, and political inequalities among their peoples. During World War II, the Nazis under Adolf Hitler enjoined the expanded ideology of "race" and "racial" differences and took them to a logical end: the extermination of 11 million people of "inferior races" (e.g., Jews, Gypsies, Africans, homosexuals, and so forth) and other unspeakable brutalities of the Holocaust.

"Race" thus evolved as a worldview, a body of prejudgments that distorts our ideas about human differences and group behavior. Racial beliefs constitute myths about the diversity in the human species and about the abilities and behavior of people homogenized into "racial" categories. The myths fused behavior and physical features together in the public mind, impeding our comprehension of both biological variations and cultural behavior, implying that both are genetically determined. Racial myths bear no relationship to the reality of human capabilities or behavior. Scientists today find that reliance on such folk beliefs about human differences in research has led to countless errors.

At the end of the 20th century, we now understand that human cultural behavior is learned, conditioned into infants beginning at birth, and always subject to modification. No human is born with a built-in culture or language. Our temperaments, dispositions, and personalities, regardless of genetic propensities, are developed within sets of meanings and values that we call "culture." Studies of infant and early childhood learning and behavior attest to the reality of our cultures in forming who we are.

It is a basic tenet of anthropological knowledge that all normal human beings have the capacity to learn any cultural behavior. The American experience with immigrants from hundreds of different language and cultural backgrounds who have acquired some version of American culture traits and behavior is the clearest evidence of this fact. Moreover, people of all physical variations have learned different cultural behaviors and continue to do so as modern transportation moves millions of immigrants around the world.

How people have been accepted and treated within the context of a given society or culture has a direct impact on how they perform in that society. The "racial" worldview was invented to assign some groups to perpetual low status, while others were permitted access to privilege, power, and wealth. The tragedy in the United States has been that the policies and practices stemming from this worldview succeeded all too well in constructing unequal populations among Europeans, Native Americans, and peoples of African descent. Given what we know about the capacity of normal humans to achieve and function within any culture, we conclude that present-day inequalities between so-called "racial" groups are not consequences of their biological inheritance but products of historical and contemporary social, economic, educational, and political circumstances.

[Note: For further information on human biological variations, see the statement prepared and issued by the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, 1996 (AJPA 101:569-570).]


AAA POSITION PAPER ON "RACE": COMMENTS?

As a result of public confusion about the meaning of "race," claims as to major biological differences among "races" continue to be advanced. Stemming from past AAA actions designed to address public misconceptions on race and intelligence, the need was apparent for a clear AAA statement on the biology and politics of race that would be educational and informational. Rather than wait for each spurious claim to be raised, the AAA Executive Board determined that the Association should prepare a statement for approval by the Association and elicit member input.

Commissioned by the Executive Board of the American Anthropological Association, a position paper on race was authored by Audrey Smedley (Race in North America: Origin and Evolution of a Worldview, 1993) and thrice reviewed by a working group of prominent anthropologists: George Armelagos, Michael Blakey, C. Loring Brace, Alan Goodman, Faye Harrison, Jonathan Marks, Yolanda Moses, and Carol Mukhopadhyay. A draft of the current paper was published in the September 1997 Anthropology Newsletter and posted ont the AAA websitewww.aaanet.org for a number of months, and member comments were requested. While Smedley assumed authorship of the final draft, she received comments not only from the working group but also from the AAA membership and other interested readers. The paper above was adopted by the AAA Executive Board on May 17, 1998, as an official statement of AAA's position on "race."

As the paper is considered a living statement, AAA members', other anthropologists', and public comments are invited. Your comments may be sent via mail or e-mail to Damon Dozier, Director of Public Affairs, American Anthropological Association, 2200 Wilson Blvd., Suite 600, Arlington, VA 22201, ddozier@aaanet.org.

Saturday, November 26, 2011

Police Tracking Your Every Move With License Plate Readers





Police Tracking Your Every Move With License Plate Readers
November 26, 2011
http://www.WebProNews.com 
 
Police Tracking Your Every Move With License Plate Readers 
Josh Wolford | Staff Writer 

Is a law enforcement aid worth sacrificing personal liberties? 

Privacy. It's on everyone's minds these days. A couple of months ago it was Apple and Google that were drawing the ire of consumers with the storing of location data. And of course, Facebook is always mentioned when people discuss their concerns about online privacy. But as technology gets better, and the tools used to capture information and the databases used to store and disseminate the information become more capable, the lines between online and offline privacy continue to blur. 

On that note, let's say that you are having a Sunday afternoon picnic with your child. The weather's good, you've been running around and playing -- but now it's time for lunch. You open up the cooler, only to discover that you've left a couple of the sandwiches in the car. The car's just a few yards away, so you quickly run to grab the sandwiches.
And in a split second, you look back to see that your child is gone. You catch a black sedan speeding away and you are barely able to catch the license plate. Because you caught that license plate, police are able to search a giant database of plate captures and track the movements of the kidnapper.

A classic question: What is more important, public safety or personal freedom? What are you willing to sacrifice?

Ok, I know this whole scenario seems a little bit Without A Trace or Lifetime movie-esque, but the point is that police were able to use an ever-expanding database of data culled from license plate snapshots in order to generate real-time location information. That's a reality, and it's happening in our nation's capital, among other places.

The Washington Post is reporting that police in D.C. are beefing up the area covered by license plate cameras. More than 250 cameras in D.C. and its suburbs are constantly hard at work, grabbing license plate numbers and sticking them into databases. The police aren't exactly doing this quietly, but it's being done with "virtually no public debate." 
The highest concentration of these plate readers in the entire nation exists in D.C. (one reader per square mile), so that means that District police are building the biggest location database based on license plates in the whole country.

Let's take a brief look at these license plate readers.

First, these are apparently different types of cameras than the cameras cities have been affixing near stoplights and other places to catch people running red lights or speeding -- the "here's a ticket 2 weeks later in the mail" cameras.

These plate readers cost about $20,000 each and can snatch images of numbers and letters on cars traveling nearly 150 mph and across four lanes of traffic. These plate readers in D.C. take 1,800 images per minute, every one of which is stored in a database.

Basically, these plate readers have made it possible for police to track everyone's movements as they move across the city.

These plate readers and the subsequent database of image captures has tipped the privacy concerns of some -- notably the American Civil Liberties Union. One of their main concerns is naturally the privacy implications. 
In the District, laws are in place that limit the amount of time that surveillance camera footage can be kept. The images must be dumped after 10 days, unless there is an actual investigatory reason to keep them. But right now, there is nothing keeping data from the plate readers from being stored for years.

The ACLU says that this database is storing the location data of innocent people. And they are right. The plate readers are casting an all-inclusive net, grabbing license plate numbers indiscriminately.
Clearly this technology is rapidly approaching the point where it could be used to reconstruct the entire movements of any individual vehicle. As we have argued in the context of GPS tracking that level of intrusion on private life is something that the police should not be able to engage in without a warrant.


Let's think back to the slightly-stylized child abduction scene from the beginning of this article. Maybe that seems a bit far-fetched, but the reality of the situation is that the plate reader database has helped police. According to the D.C. police department, they make an arrest a day with the help of the plate readers. In a four month period this year, they also found 51 stolen cars.

And although our child abduction story above might seem unrealistic, the possibilities are there for the plate readers to help in truly significant ways. Police could track cars to and from murder scenes or use it to identify players in organized crime circles like sex trafficking -- by logging which cars travel between certain locations.

But the fact that the technology is beneficial or could be beneficial in terms of law enforcement does not assuage concerns of a "surveillance society" becoming the norm in the U.S. It's a classic argument that pits personal liberties against security and safety. Just how much of your freedom are you able to give up to feel safer? This is a crucial debate that we've seen play out most recently after 9/11 with the Patriot Act.

The ACLU channels Minority Report to discuss preemptive law enforcement:
Of course, if the police track all of us all the time, there is no doubt that will help to solve some crimes -- just as it would no doubt help solve some crimes if they could read everybody's e-mail and install cameras in everybody's homes. But in a free society, we don't let the police watch over us just because we might do something wrong. That is not the balance struck by our Constitution and is not the balance we should strike in our policymaking.
Obviously, the plate readers are a valuable tool for the police, and there are an abundance of situations where one could imagine the searchable database of plate captures to be extremely useful. But are those plate readers building up a database that's just a little too full of innocent people's location information for your liking? 

If this kind of thing is to proliferate (both in D.C. and across the country), it is argued that it needs to see the light of day. Basically, society should have time to debate its merits and discuss their concerns. "The police should not be able to run out and buy a new technology and put it in place before anybody realizes what's going on," says Jay Stanley of the ACLU's Privacy and Technology Program.

What do you think about the expansion of the plate reader technology? Do the benefits outweigh the privacy and personal freedom concerns? Or is this an example of big brother yielding too much power with the ability to catalog this data without warrants?

Thursday, November 10, 2011

Penn State Rapist Jerry Sandusky


Child Rapist and Expert Sexual Predator, Jerry Sandusky in 1999, with Coach Paterno


This will be our main Jerry The Pedophile Page. Over time, expect to see much here regarding this brazen child rapist and those that protect/protected him:

You can read the full Grand Jury report from the Jerry Sandusky/Penn State allegations here.

*Read with caution as the accounts recalled in this report are of graphic nature. *http://cbschicago.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/sandusky-grand-jury-presentment.pdf

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