HOME PAGE (CLICK HERE)





******* READ ABOUT: Little Rock's Newest Corrupt Police Chief Kenton Buckner *******


Thursday, September 29, 2016

Police release Walker arrest video; shows cops accusing him of being 'race baiter'


Police release Walker arrest video; shows cops accusing him of being 'race baiter'
MVR Camera 1

MVR Camera 2

UPDATE: ALL charges have been dropped on both Representative John Walker and associate, Omavi Kushukuru.

Arkansas State Rep. who pushed for law to film police, arrested for filming police


Ark Times Reports:
Officer Jeff Thompson

Arkansas State Representative John Walker was arrested on Monday morning, Sept. 26, 016.

Police release Walker arrest video; shows cops accusing him of being 'race baiter'

Little Rock police were in the process of arresting a stopped driver for theft of property around 11:30 a.m. at 9th and Commerce streets.
Officer Jason Roberts

Walker, 79, walked into the scene of the traffic stop and began filming the incident.  The arrested driver asked what Walker was doing, to which Walker responded, "I'm making sure they don't kill you."

After escorting the driver to the patrol car in handcuffs, police found that the passenger of the stopped call also had an outstanding arrest warrant.

As the police were arresting the passenger, Walker and another individual approached the scene in a "antagonistic and provocative manner."  Officers repeatedly told both individuals to stop and stay away from the scene.

Walker told the police he was not going to leave and instructed the police to arrest him.  Police obliged and charged him with interfering with government operations.  The other individual was also arrested.

At the station, Walker informed the jailers that he only wanted to file a complaint "against the white officers."

Police release Walker arrest video; shows cops accusing him of being 'race baiter'

The Little Rock police department released copies of dash camera footage of a traffic stop that led to the arrests of state Rep. John Walker, 79, for obstructing governmental operations, a charge later dropped.

ArkansasMatters.com further reports: The email that Little Rock Police Department Chief Kenton Buckner sent to officers late Wednesday night has the subject line "Stay Professional." It reads, in part, "There are multiple opinions about how the entire incident was handled." Walker was issued a letter of apology from the LRPD that he rejected. On Thursday, he and Shukur held a news conference to discuss what happened. "With these tapes, you saw that we did nothing," Walker said, speaking of dash camera video from police cruisers the LRPD had released on Wednesday.


Walker and Shukur spoke for nearly an hour about the events that led to their arrest and also about what they say is the mistreatment of black people in Central Arkansas.
Walker says he and Shukur were peacefully exercising their right to record police interactions when they were approached by officers who made disparaging comments.

Minority neighborhoods, they say, are targeted by overzealous police, but the majority of the time it goes unnoticed.

The footage released today comes from four cameras and include an extended amount of filming as two teams of officers — each with a trainee — handle the traffic stop of a car without a license. The driver and a passenger en route to a doctor's appointment had outstanding minor warrants.

Walker walks up during the stop and begins filming with a cell phone from across the street, an activity noticed by cops on the scene, some of whom know Walker. In time, two officers cross the street to ask Walker what he's doing and why. He identified himself but said he didn't need to explain his actions.

Officers explained the traffic stop and said the driver was being treated with "total respect." They also said they agreed he had a right to observe.

The conversation grew heated, however, as Walker explained his interest in treatment of black suspects and made reference to police use of deadly force. That raised the ire of an officer who asked if Walker had ever been a police officer. He questioned whether Walker understood the challenges police face. One officer called Walker a "race baiter" and asked if he'd be interested if police had stopped a white person. The officer said Walker had been trying to film police for years and was just trying to provoke.

Film in another patrol car, taking the driver to jail, has audio of an older officer telling a younger black female officer who'd made the stop about Walker: "His main purpose was to be arrested." Walker, he said, had been "a thorn in the side of the police department" since he joined the force.

The treatment of the people originally stopped seemed calm, even amiable. Officers tried to look for a way around jailing of the man who used a wheelchair, hoping to just issue a citation.

KARK has posted a separate 19-minute video clip that eventually gets to the discussion between Walker and two officers.

Walker has rejected an apology for the arrest and Police Chief Kenton Buckner has said he anticipates a lawsuit over the encounter. The department is investigating officers' actions in the case. The city has maintained the obstruction charge against Omavi Kushukuru (or Shukur). He is alleged to have walked between the patrol car that made the initial stop and the car in which two people were found to have warrants.

A female officer in a later arriving unit said somebody walked from across the street into the scene of the stop.

Thursday, September 22, 2016

AMERICA: CIVIL WAR IS ALREADY HERE

Title 42, U.S.C., Section 14141 makes it unlawful for state or local law enforcement agencies to allow officers to engage in a pattern or practice of conduct that deprives persons of rights protected by the Constitution or U.S. laws. This law, commonly referred to as the Police Misconduct Statute, gives the Department of Justice authority to seek civil remedies in cases where law enforcement agencies have policies or practices that foster a pattern of misconduct by employees. This action is directed against an agency, not against individual officers. The types of issues which may initiate a pattern and practice investigation include:
--Lack of supervision/monitoring of officers’ actions;
--Lack of justification or reporting by officers on incidents involving the use of force;
--Lack of, or improper training of, officers; and
**Citizen complaint processes that treat complainants as adversaries.**

Bizarre Story of an Anti-Corruption Blogger's Deadly Confrontation With a Dirty Cop
Little Rock's Legacy of Elitist Police Racism Exposed

Ean Bordeaux was part of the bizarre story of a deadly confrontation between a fired corrupt Little Rock police officer and Bordeaux, a hot dog vendor and anti-corruption blogger.

Former Little Rock Police Officer, Todd Payne, died after being tackled and hitting the ground face first by Bordeaux on April 18, 2014.

READ ABOUT: Little Rock's Newest Corrupt Police Chief Kenton Buckner
This was after Payne reportedly set Bordeaux's hot dog cart on fire twice & shot and killed his dog earlier in January of 2014 along with shooting at least fives times into Bordeaux's bedroom, two bullets in the neighbors window, plus the bullet retrieved from the chest of Bordeaux's dead family dog Dixie.
http://corruptionsucks.blogspot.com/…/vice-anti-corruption-…

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

To Change Police Practices, A Push For Liability Insurance In Minneapolis

Title 42, U.S.C., Section 14141 makes it unlawful for state or local law enforcement agencies to allow officers to engage in a pattern or practice of conduct that deprives persons of rights protected by the Constitution or U.S. laws. This law, commonly referred to as the Police Misconduct Statute, gives the Department of Justice authority to seek civil remedies in cases where law enforcement agencies have policies or practices that foster a pattern of misconduct by employees. This action is directed against an agency, not against individual officers. The types of issues which may initiate a pattern and practice investigation include:
--Lack of supervision/monitoring of officers’ actions;
--Lack of justification or reporting by officers on incidents involving the use of force;
--Lack of, or improper training of, officers; and
**Citizen complaint processes that treat complainants as adversaries.**


NPR REPORTS: 

AROUND THE NATION

To The Change Police Practices, A Push For Liability Insurance In Minneapolis















Michelle Gross (right) is a member of the Committee for Professional Policing, 
which is proposing a ballot measure in Minneapolis that would require police officers 
to carry liability insurance.
Martin Kaste for NPR
When cities settle cases of inappropriate or illegal force by police officers, they pay — a lot. Chicago alone has paid out more than half a billion dollars since 2004.
Yet some advocates say all those payouts haven't had much of an effect on policing practices.
In Minneapolis, longtime activist Michelle Gross says when cities pay damages, individual police officers often aren't held accountable, which means they're not likely to change their behavior. That's why she and a group calling itself the Committee for Professional Policing are now pushing a completely different approach.
"We are working to get a measure on the ballot that would require police officers to carry professional liability insurance," she says.
Some officers already carry liability insurance, on a voluntary basis. Gross' group wants to make it a condition of employment in Minneapolis. Their proposal would have the city cover the cost of basic insurance, but any premium increases due to misconduct would be the officer's responsibility.
Dave Bicking, also a member of the ballot campaign, says the beauty of this scheme is that bad cops would pay more; the worse the track record, the more expensive the premium.
"We have one officer [in Minneapolis] who's had five significant settlements against him just in a year and a half," Bicking says. "Someone like that could never, ever buy insurance. They'd have to charge him $60[000]-$70,000 a year. That officer would be gone."
The plan has a simple appeal. But police call it simplistic.
"I always equate police work to, like, basketball. If you're not getting any fouls, you're not playing hard enough," says Lt. Bob Kroll, president of the Police Officers Federation of Minneapolis.
He says if cops have to start worrying about insurance rates, they're liable to become overly cautious."Anybody can get in the squad car and drive around and put the blinders on, and not investigate suspicious circumstances," he says. "If you don't do that proactive police work, your likelihood of being sued is a lot less."
Even some of those hoping for change in police practices see a problem there. "I'd have to see what it is that they're going to use to determine what's going to increase that premium," says Michael Quinn, a retired Minneapolis officer, who wrote a book about misconduct and now teaches police ethics. He's not sure insurance companies should be the ones evaluating an officer's performance. "I don't trust the system to do that right."
Still, he sympathizes with the activists' goal, because he believes the current system isn't working. Quinn says the beneficial feedback that's supposed to happen after a lawsuit — when the officer is disciplined or gets a lecture — just isn't happening enough.
"I think the poor management and the lack of the supervision is what's leading to this stuff," he says. "The cops aren't being held accountable, the supervisors aren't holding them accountable, and we're going to continue to have this money being paid out."
Police unions in Minneapolis and other cities say part of the problem is that city councils are too quick to pay damages, even on frivolous complaints, just to save money on litigation. They'd like to see cities taking more plaintiffs to court, which — they believe — would decrease the number of brutality complaints and paint a more positive picture of police conduct.
University of Chicago Law assistant professor John Rappaport has been studying the question of how and why cities pay out damages on behalf of their police. He says there's often a disconnect between payouts and accountability.
"We're very much stuck in a rut, with American policing," he says. He has been investigating whether cities that pay damages out of their own funds — cities such as Minneapolis and Chicago — are less likely to hold officers accountable than cities that have liability insurance.
Rappaport hasn't looked at the question of whether a requirement of individual policies would affect police behavior, largely because he knows of no police department that requires it. He has doubts about whether it would work — for one thing, he doesn't think premiums would really go up enough to discourage bad behavior.

"This moment is really causing people to be interested in shaking things up," he says. "I don't know whether this is the right answer or not ... but we won't ever know until someone tries it and we get a chance to see how it works."But Rappaport says he "loves" the fact that the Minneapolis activists are proposing this.
The Committee for Professional Policing has until July 5 to collect signatures — at last count, it was within 509 valid signatures of the number required, according to the Minneapolis City Clerk.
If the committee collects enough, it will then be up to the City Council to decide whether the proposal is legal (the police union argues it's not legal under state law). If the council approves it, it will be on the ballot this fall.


WE ARE AT WAR: #BettyShelby
"Officer Betty Shelby shoots an unarmed man, #TerrenceCrutcher for looking like a "bad dude" ?? And there are people out there mad that black people (AND others) are taking a knee when the national anthem is being sung. They are mad that blacks don't stand and be proud to be in a country they live in and does NOTHING to protect blacks from being slaughtered by cops. 
There's clearly a war going on and minority Americans are the target.
GOOD COPS WHERE ARE YOU???? ALWAYS CONVENIENTLY QUIET!! ESPECIALLY BLACK COPS!"

#bluelivesmatter #blueliesmatter #allivesmatter #OfficerBettyShelby#HandsUpDontShoot #Blacklivesmatter #ITSTOOMUCH The New White Panther Party White Panther Party Anon Resistance Arkansas #Anonymous#AnonymousResistance

Monday, September 19, 2016

SEX FREAK: police captain resigns after shameful arrest at public park

As reported By Brandon Riddle of the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

State police captain resigns after arrest at Arkansas park


An Arkansas State Police captain has resigned amid accusations that he asked undercover Fort Smith detectives to perform a sex act while he watched at a city park earlier this week.
Arkansas State Police Director Col. Bill Bryant received a one-sentence memo Friday from state police Capt. Bryan Davis, 51, of Troop H according to a news release. That resignation was accepted by Bryant and then forwarded to the department's human resources division for processing.
Davis' memo reads: “Please accept this as my letter of resignation from the Arkansas State Police to be effective immediately.”
His resignation comes three days after his arrest Tuesday afternoon on a misdemeanor loitering charge as officers conducted a random check for sexual activity in a parking area of a riverfront trail north of downtown Fort Smith, the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette previously reported.

READ ABOUT: Little Rock's Newest Corrupt Police Chief Kenton Buckner
“I am disappointed by the alleged incident that has led to this resignation,” Bryant said in a statement. “However, I believe it is of the utmost importance that we, as law enforcement officers, represent ourselves in an honorable and professional manner, and exhibit higher standards, both in our private lives and in our public duties, exceeding the principles and expectations of others.”
Davis is set to be arraigned Sept. 8 on the class C misdemeanor charge. If convicted, that count carries a maximum penalty of 30 days in jail and a fine of up to $500.

Thursday, September 15, 2016

VICE: Anti-Corruption Blogger Recounts Multiple Murder Attempts By Corrupt Little Rock Cop

Title 42, U.S.C., Section 14141 makes it unlawful for state or local law enforcement agencies to allow officers to engage in a pattern or practice of conduct that deprives persons of rights protected by the Constitution or U.S. laws. This law, commonly referred to as the Police Misconduct Statute, gives the Department of Justice authority to seek civil remedies in cases where law enforcement agencies have policies or practices that foster a pattern of misconduct by employees. This action is directed against an agency, not against individual officers. The types of issues which may initiate a pattern and practice investigation include:
--Lack of supervision/monitoring of officers’ actions;
--Lack of justification or reporting by officers on incidents involving the use of force;
--Lack of, or improper training of, officers; and
**Citizen complaint processes that treat complainants as adversaries.**

A HOT-DOG-SELLING BLOGGER TOLD US ABOUT THE ALLEGED CORRUPT COP HE SAYS TRIED TO KILL HIM AND DIED TRYING

By James Williamson Aug 11 2014
Ean Bordeaux. Photo by Mike Poe
When Ean Bordeaux isn't selling hot dogs at the River Market in Little Rock, Arkansas, he’s writing about racketeering and police misconduct (cops doing racist shit) on his blog, which allegedly motivated Todd Payne, a former cop, to try to kill him. “There are members of the Little Rock Police Department actively and unceasingly engaging in such illegal activities as racketeering, complainant and witness intimidation,” Bordeaux posted. “MOST of these mercenary police officers reside OUTSIDE of Little Rock City Limits. This only adds insult to injury as they are not even citizens of our great city, but are unwisely and irresponsibly allowed to SHOOT and KILL its citizens.”

According to Bordeaux, he had known Payne since 2004, when the cop started hanging out around Bordeaux’s hot dog stand. Bordeaux says Payne began leaking him internal information about cops. At the same time, Bordeaux claims, Payne passed information about his hot dog business to a small group of rogue police officers to sabotage the blogger’s finances. 

These activities eventually caught up with Payne. In 2010 he lost his job because he allegedly used an illness as an excuse to refuse to break up a bar fight, according to the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette. But Payne’s departure from the police force didn't stop Bordeaux from blogging about him. In the past four years, the hot dog vendor has targeted both Payne and a River Market cop who was his partner. “This corrupt piece of work was besties and rookie school partners with dog murdering hate crime arsonist Joel 'Creepy Todd' Payne,” Ean wrote

In retaliation, Payne allegedly tried to kill Bordeaux and ruin his hot dog business. In January 2014, Payne allegedly shot up Bordeaux’s house. Five bullets struck six inches above the hot dog vendor’s head, two hit the downstairs neighbor’s window, and another killed his dog, Dixie. 



Dixie. Photo by Ean Bordeaux

Payne messaged Bordeaux on Facebook on March 1 to ask him bizarre questions. “I’m reading your shooting report. Was the dog outside or inside when it was shot?” he wrote. He also asked, “Why were you untruthful with the police dept? They are laughing their asses off at you. That’s why the report was sent to me.” 

In April, Arkansas Online reported on an even more dramatic incident. Payne allegedly returned to Bordeaux’s home—this time to allegedly light the blogger’s hot dog cart on fire. Bordeaux spotted him. Payne bolted from the house and then returned to try to wreck the hot dog cart again. 

Lieutenant Sidney Allen told Arkansas Online that, “The suspect fled on foot and was caught by Bordeaux within a short distance.” The official police version of the story then has a big jump forward in time: “Details are limited, but while Bordeaux was engaged with the suspect, the suspect sustained injuries that later led to his death at a local hospital.”

I called Bordeaux to find out more, and to discuss his hot dog vending business, Payne’s alleged attempt on his life, and police brutality. 

VICE: Before Payne tried to kill you, how did he or other cops try to ruin your hot dog business? 

Ean Bordeaux: His rookie school buddy was happy to manipulate behind the scenes. If it was a private location, [his rookie school buddy] would find out who the landlord was and defame my business. [He would also] look for vendors sympathetic to his cause and get them to “complain” about my affairs or me. For city locations, he tried to get some official to go along with him—he went as far as to go into the code office to push his weight around, looking for a way to get me “cased up.”


Payne left your house and then came back in April. How long did it take for the police to arrive?

When I contacted 911 for the first time, it was at 4:22 AM. My next call was at 4:45 AM. So between 4:22 and 4:45, there was nothing. It was in this time that the masked man returned. I was in my bathrobe, practically naked. [My dogs] were barking—I was lying down and waiting for the invasion bark. [The dogs have barks] like I’ve-never-seen-this-motherfucker-before bark and the you-ain’t-doin’-shit-around-here bark. These are smart fucking dogs, trust me. 

I was getting the alarm barks, which mean, “Daddy, that’s the same person who did the last shit.” I looked at the monitors on the security surveillance system that I just put in two days prior because my girl, thankfully,  just kept bitching at me about it. I caught that bark, and I screamed, “HE’S BACK!” I could barely see the figure coming across the bridge. I was seeing what the figure was going to do. He’s crossing the street, heading directly to the cart. When I was about 10 feet away, he was already at the cart, dumping lighter fluid on it. And I said, “HEY! WHAT ARE YOU DOING?!” He looked up and started dumping more, and tried to light it more quickly. 



Damaged Willy Dog Cart. Photo by Ean Bordeaux

Is it true Payne wore a mask that night?

Yes, he was wearing a mask. He was moving a little bit faster than a fat crackhead would move. In the process, I saw a hand swinging out with something dark and long in it. Every crackhead I know at least has a steak knife on him, so I was thinking, Oh God, I just fucked up. My fucking Crocs were off. I was in pursuit of a man who may have something far more than what I have. 

You claim you eventually tackled him. What did he do after you tackled him?

I saw him down, and I knew I had to get up first. I said, “Stay the fuck down. Don’t fucking move.” I watched for his hands that were underneath him. At this point, I was thinking, This is fucking Todd. He may be trying to act like he’s out or something and shoot the shit out of me. I was still freaking out. I don’t know if he’s going to get up—and then I heard him snore. 

He started snoring? 

Yeah, and to me, this was sweet fucking relief. He’s twitching a little. (I couldn't tell what it was, but I wasn't going to be taking no fucking chances.) I called 911 again. All I could get out was, “I need you now. I need you now. He came back. Where are you?” I sat down on the curb and waited on the police. Man, it was surreal as shit. 

How would you label Payne’s crime? 

It’s a hate crime. He’s an admitted racist trying to burn a nigger up; I gotta fucking hate crime on my lawn. That’s the bottom line here—just having to stand my ground.

CORRUPTION SUCKS BLOG : it's purpose

CORRUPTION SUCKS BLOG: it's purpose 

Overview

The primary goal of Corruption Sucks Blog is to provide the tools, research, resources, and news to help good government, cops, community leaders, victims, and other concerned citizens address the complex issue of governmental & especially police misconduct. 

Our goal is to make it as easy as possible for everyone to get up to speed on how prevelant governmental corruption and misconduct actually are in everyday local government. Especially regarding police misconduct and the woeful lack of police oversight at the local levels of government supervision.

This way, more energy can be constructively invested on real progress, especially in law enforcement and how they deal with members of the community. 

Most especially if the officer resides in another city or town other than where he works and carries a gun & badge. This basically defines him as a "mercenary cop" from the start and NOT a member of the community in which he has been authorized by the city to use deadly force if he feels that his "life is in danger".

What is a bad cop?

"Bad cops" are law enforcement employees that are not meeting job requirements. Many of the employees who fall within this category are not bad people, but rather, just need quality oversight to keep them on the right path.

On one end of the spectrum, bad cops are criminals with badges. On the other end of the spectrum, bad cops are employees who are not qualified for their jobs & either require additional training or seperation. For example, they have difficulty authoring accurate police reports, they have difficulty keeping their personal biases at home, etc.

Because almost every police department has good cops and bad cops...

Reality is if this world was actually as most people think it is, we would not have independent investigations, audits & police internal affairs departments. This anti-corruption blog site would not exist. 

Reality is that almost every police department has both good cops and bad cops. 

The problem is that many police departments refuse to acknowledge or proactively address the bad cops within their ranks.

So, as far as what does a "good" cop look like? I'm sure that there are a great many cops that are quite "good" at executing their duties. 

With that said, we offer you this thought...

How good can any person truly be while witnessing a co-worker violate the rights of another human being, yet does absolutely nothing about it? How can such a so-called good person call such a criminal amongst their ranks an equal partner in honor and justice?  If you venture to call him comrade and friend, are you not in some way torn from the very same blue cloth?

How could this so-called good person remain silent to such racketeer-styled predicate crimes in exchange for a paycheck and benefits while cowering behind some mafia-like blue wall? That is obviously the price that many have gladly decided to pay in exchange for one's honor and soul-  a job. 

Is this that higher standard that we have heard so much about? Is this what the call of duty, oath and honor now look like? 

I would surely hope not.

We can believe that there exists police departments that do not have a single bad cop; and conversely, we can believe that there exists police departments that do not have a single good cop. It first starts from within, then maybe we can start talking about public trust. 

The public has absolutely no way of knowing which cop is pulling them over, knocking on their door, impeding their path, demanding to be obeyed...or else.

E. Pluribus Unum. 



Most Popular Posts On Corruption Sucks Blog