World’s most corrupt nations


Corruption is now recognized as one of the world’s greatest challenges. It is a major hindrance to sustainable development and is corrosive on the very fabric of society. Its disproportionate impact on poor communities is considerable, curbing economic growth, distorting competition, and representing serious legal risks. According to Transparency International’s latest corruption index, there are 75 of 180 countries surveyed scored under 3 on 10-point scale of governmental honesty. Corruption is a fixture in Egypt, India, and Pakistan. 60% of executives surveyed in these countries reported to have been solicited for a bribe. The Transparency International compiled multiple sources from World Bank assessments, the Bertelsmann Transformation Index, and surveys. The following lists most corrupt countries in the world.


Haiti is the poorest country in the Americas by most economic measures, with a GDP per capita of 790 USD, about $2 per person per day. After two years of this island nation’s independence declaration, its first emperor Jean Jacques Dessalines was shot by angry citizens. The death toll from the 2010 earthquake indicates its government’s poor ability in providing for its citizens and increasing wealth of aristocratic families.


Comparative social and economic indicators show that this country has fell behind other low-income developing countries since the 1980s.
Comparative social and economic indicators show that this country has fell behind other low-income developing countries since the 1980s.


Afghanistan will not be likely to clean up its rampant corruption soon. It is reported that President Hamid Karzai's brother has ties to Afghanistan’s virulent opium trade.


Afghanistan is a landlocked country in south-central Asia.
Afghanistan is a landlocked country in south-central Asia.


Iraq's Shiite leaders are widely criticized for corrupt dealings. This country is deprived of electricity, fuel supplies and water due to such corrupt dealings. It has taken part in Oslo-based program which targets at reducing corruption.


Iraq has joined the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative.
Iraq has joined the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative.


Myanmar is rich in minerals, and natural gas. It is also an ideal transit point for illegal drugs. The U.S government has recently slapped sanctions against over 100 of Myanmar’s leaders and leading economic institutions.


Myanmar has become the scene of
Myanmar has become the scene of "economic plunder" by its rulers


Iran’s corruption is rooted by inefficient subsidy programs, smuggling to foil international sanctions, and state-controlled oil industry.


President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is a coalition of conservative political groups in Iran.
President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is a coalition of conservative political groups in Iran.


Chad’s President Idriss Deby commandeered oil revenue which was supposed to be used for education, reduction of poverty, and health care. This led the World Bank to pull out of a $3.7 billion pipeline project in 2008.


Chad has dropped from No. 1 to No. 7 this year.
Chad has dropped from No. 1 to No. 7 this year.


Somalia has been synonymous with piracy. Nervous shipowners paid millions of dollars in ransom money annually. The African Development Bank has promised $2milion to help this country found a central bank and anti-corruption.


Piracy is probably Somalia’s most lucrative industry.
Piracy is probably Somalia’s most lucrative industry.


Corruption and oppression are getting worse in Uzbekistan, the most populous. Uzbekistan is a doubly landlocked country in Central Asia. This nation has a very low GNI per capita (US$610 in current dollars in 2006).


Uzbekistan's President Islam Karimov is one of Central Asia's most autocratic leaders.
Uzbekistan's President Islam Karimov is one of Central Asia's most autocratic leaders.


Sudan, which is rich in resource, has difficulties in telling its citizens where their money is going. Global Witness disclosed serious discrepancies between the way the government’s accounting and Chinese oil companies’ report of their Sudanese oil production for the same.


Sudan faces formidable economic problems, as it must rise from a very low level of per capita output.
Sudan faces formidable economic problems, as it must rise from a very low level of per capita output.

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